Ansible Automation with Cisco ASA Multi-Context Mode

I thought I’d share my experience using Ansible and Cisco ASA firewalls in multi-context mode. Right from the beginning I had a few issues deploying the configuration and the switch between the different security context didn’t work well. I got the error you see below when I tried to run a playbook. Other times the changeto context didn’t work well and applied the wrong config:

[email protected]:~$ ansible-playbook -i inventory site.yml --ask-vault-pass
Vault password:

PLAY [all] ***************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

TASK [hostname : set dns and hostname] ***********************************************************************************************************************************************
An exception occurred during task execution. To see the full traceback, use -vvv. The error was: error: [Errno 61] Connection refused
fatal: [fwcontext01]: FAILED! => {"changed": false, "err": "[Errno 61] Connection refused", "msg": "unable to connect to socket"}
ok: [fwcontext02]

TASK [interfaces : write interfaces config] ******************************************************************************************************************************************
ok: [fwcontext02]

....

After a bit of troubleshooting I found a workaround to limit the amount of processes Ansible use and set this limit to one in the Ansible.cfg. The default is five processes if forks is not defined as far as I remember.

[defaults]
inventory = ./inventory
host_key_checking=False
jinja2_extensions=jinja2.ext.do
forks = 1

In the example inventory file, the “inventory_hostname” variable represents the security context and as you see the “ansible_ssh_host” is set to the IP address of the admin context:

fwcontext01 ansible_ssh_host=192.168.0.1 ansible_ssh_port=22 ansible_ssh_user='ansible' ansible_ssh_pass='cisco'
fwcontext02 ansible_ssh_host=192.168.0.1 ansible_ssh_port=22 ansible_ssh_user='ansible' ansible_ssh_pass='cisco'

When you run the playbook again you can see that the playbook runs successfully but deploys the changes one by one to each firewall security context, the disadvantage is that the playbook takes much longer to run:

[email protected]:~$ ansible-playbook site.yml

PLAY [all] ***************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

TASK [hostname : set dns and hostname] ***********************************************************************************************************************************************
ok: [fwcontext01]
ok: [fwcontext02]

TASK [interfaces : write interfaces config] ******************************************************************************************************************************************
ok: [fwcontext01]
ok: [fwcontext02]

Example site.yml

---

- hosts: all
  connection: local
  gather_facts: 'no'

  vars:
    cli:
      username: "{{ ansible_ssh_user }}"
      password: "{{ ansible_ssh_pass }}"
      host: "{{ ansible_ssh_host }}"

  roles:
    - interfaces

In the example Interface role you see that the context is set to “inventory_hostname” variable:

---

- name: write interfaces config
  asa_config:
    src: "templates/interfaces.j2"
    provider: "{{ cli }}"
    context: "{{ inventory_hostname }}"
  register: result

- name: enable interfaces
  asa_config:
    parents: "interface {{ item.0 }}"
    lines: "no shutdown"
    match: none
    provider: "{{ cli }}"
    context: "{{ inventory_hostname }}"
  when: result.changed
  with_items:
    - "{{ interfaces.items() }}"

After modifying the forks, the Ansible playbook runs well with Cisco ASA in multi-context mode, like mentioned before it is a bit slow to deploy the configuration if I compare this to Cumulus Linux or any other Linux system.

Please share your feedback.

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BGP EVPN and VXLAN with Cumulus Linux

I did some updates on my Cumulus Linux Vagrant topology and added new functions to my post about an Ansible Playbook for the Cumulus Linux BGP IP-Fabric.

To the Vagrant topology, I added 6x servers and per clag-pair, each server is connected to a VLAN and the second server is connected to a VXLAN.

Here are the links to the repositories where you find the Ansible Playbook https://github.com/berndonline/cumulus-lab-provision and the Vagrantfile https://github.com/berndonline/cumulus-lab-vagrant

In the Ansible Playbook, I added BGP EVPN and one VXLAN which spreads over all Leaf and Edge switches. VXLAN routing is happening on the Edge switches into the rest of the virtual data centre network.

Here is an example of the additional variables I added to edge-1 for BGP EVPN and VXLAN:

group_vars/edge.yml:

clagd_vxlan_anycast_ip: 10.255.100.1

The VXLAN anycast IP is needed in BGP for EVPN and the same IP is shared between edge-1 and edge-2. The same is for the other leaf switches, per clag pair they share the same anycast IP address.

host_vars/edge-1.yml:

---

loopback: 10.255.0.3/32

bgp_fabric:
  asn: 65001
  router_id: 10.255.0.3
  neighbor:
    - swp51
    - swp52
  networks:
    - 10.0.4.0/24
    - 10.255.0.3/32
    - 10.255.100.1/32
    - 10.0.255.0/28
  evpn: true
  advertise_vni: true

peerlink:
  bond_slaves: swp53 swp54
  mtu: 9216
  vlan: 4094
  address: 169.254.1.1/30
  clagd_peer_ip: 169.254.1.2
  clagd_backup_ip: 192.168.100.4
  clagd_sys_mac: 44:38:39:FF:40:94
  clagd_priority: 4096

bridge:
  ports: peerlink vxlan10201
  vids: 901 201

vlans:
  901:
    alias: edge-transit-901
    vipv4: 10.0.255.14/28
    vmac: 00:00:5e:00:09:01
    pipv4: 10.0.255.12/28
  201:
    alias: prod-server-10201
    vipv4: 10.0.4.254/24
    vmac: 00:00:00:00:02:01
    pipv4: 10.0.4.252/24
    vlan_id: 201
    vlan_raw_device: bridge

vxlans:
  10201:
    alias: prod-server-10201
    vxlan_local_tunnelip: 10.255.0.3
    bridge_access: 201
    bridge_learning: 'off'
    bridge_arp_nd_suppress: 'on'

On the Edge switches, because of VXLAN routing, you find a mapping between VXLAN 10201 to VLAN 201 which has VRR running.

I needed to do some modifications to the interfaces template interfaces_config.j2:

{% if loopback is defined %}
auto lo
iface lo inet loopback
    address {{ loopback }}
{% if clagd_vxlan_anycast_ip is defined %}
    clagd-vxlan-anycast-ip {{ clagd_vxlan_anycast_ip }}
{% endif %}
{% endif %}
...
{% if bridge is defined %}
{% for vxlan_id, value in vxlans.items() %}
auto vxlan{{ vxlan_id }}
iface vxlan{{ vxlan_id }}
    alias {{ value.alias }}
    vxlan-id {{ vxlan_id }}
    vxlan-local-tunnelip {{ value.vxlan_local_tunnelip }}
    bridge-access {{ value.bridge_access }}
    bridge-learning {{ value.bridge_learning }}
    bridge-arp-nd-suppress {{ value.bridge_arp_nd_suppress }}
    mstpctl-bpduguard yes
    mstpctl-portbpdufilter yes

{% endfor %}
{% endif %}

There were also some modifications needed to the FRR template frr.j2 to add EVPN to the BGP configuration:

...
{% if bgp_fabric.evpn is defined %}
 address-family ipv6 unicast
  neighbor fabric activate
 exit-address-family
 !
 address-family l2vpn evpn
  neighbor fabric activate
{% if bgp_fabric.advertise_vni is defined %}
  advertise-all-vni
{% endif %}
 exit-address-family
{% endif %}
{% endif %}
...

For more detailed information about EVPN and VXLAN routing on Cumulus Linux, I recommend reading the documentation Ethernet Virtual Private Network – EVPN and VXLAN Routing.

Have fun testing the new features in my Ansible Playbook and please share your feedback.

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Ansible Playbook for Arista vEOS BGP IP-Fabric

Over the Christmas holidays, I was working just for fun on an Arista vEOS Vagrant topology and Ansible Playbook. I reused my Ansible Playbook from my previous post about an Ansible Playbook for Cumulus Linux BGP IP-Fabric and Cumulus NetQ Validation.

Arista only has a Virtualbox vEOS image and there is an ISO image to boot the virtual appliance which I don’t understand why they have done this, rather I prefer the way Cumulus provide their VX images for testing to use with Virtualbox or KVM.

I found an interesting blog post on how to run vEOS images with KVM (Libvirt). I tried it and I could run vEOS in KVM but unfortunately, it wasn’t  stable enough to run more complex virtual network topologies so I had to switch back to Virtualbox. I will give it a try again in a few month because I prefer KVM over Virtualbox.

Anyway, you’ll find more information about how to use vEOS with Virtualbox and Vagrant.

My Virtualbox Vagrantfile can be found in my Github repository: https://github.com/berndonline/arista-lab-vagrant

Network overview:

Ansible Playbook:

As I have mentioned before I tried to be close as possible to my Cumulus Linux Ansible Playbook and tried to keep the variables and roles the same. They are differences of course in the Jinja2 templates and tasks but the overall structure is similar.

Here you’ll find the repository with the Ansible Playbook: https://github.com/berndonline/arista-lab-provision

Because Arista didn’t prepare the images very well and only created a vagrant user without adding the ssh key for authentication I needed to use a CLI provider with a username and password. But this is only a minor issue otherwise it works the same. See the site.yml below:

---

- hosts: network

  connection: local
  gather_facts: 'False'

  vars:
    cli:
      username: vagrant
      password: vagrant

  roles:
    - leafgroups
    - hostname
    - interfaces
    - routing
    - ntp

In the roles, I have used the Arista EOS Ansible modules eos_config and eos_system.

Boot up the Vagrant environment and then run the Playbook afterwards:

PLAY [network] *****************************************************************

TASK [leafgroups : create leaf groups based on clag_pairs] *********************
ok: [leaf-1] => (item=(u'leafgroup1', [u'leaf-1', u'leaf-2']))
skipping: [leaf-1] => (item=(u'leafgroup2', [u'leaf-3', u'leaf-4'])) 
skipping: [leaf-3] => (item=(u'leafgroup1', [u'leaf-1', u'leaf-2'])) 
ok: [leaf-3] => (item=(u'leafgroup2', [u'leaf-3', u'leaf-4']))
skipping: [leaf-4] => (item=(u'leafgroup1', [u'leaf-1', u'leaf-2'])) 
ok: [leaf-2] => (item=(u'leafgroup1', [u'leaf-1', u'leaf-2']))
skipping: [leaf-2] => (item=(u'leafgroup2', [u'leaf-3', u'leaf-4'])) 
ok: [leaf-4] => (item=(u'leafgroup2', [u'leaf-3', u'leaf-4']))
skipping: [spine-1] => (item=(u'leafgroup1', [u'leaf-1', u'leaf-2'])) 
skipping: [spine-1] => (item=(u'leafgroup2', [u'leaf-3', u'leaf-4'])) 
skipping: [spine-2] => (item=(u'leafgroup1', [u'leaf-1', u'leaf-2'])) 
skipping: [spine-2] => (item=(u'leafgroup2', [u'leaf-3', u'leaf-4'])) 

TASK [leafgroups : include leaf group variables] *******************************
ok: [leaf-1] => (item=(u'leafgroup1', [u'leaf-1', u'leaf-2']))
skipping: [leaf-3] => (item=(u'leafgroup1', [u'leaf-1', u'leaf-2'])) 
skipping: [leaf-1] => (item=(u'leafgroup2', [u'leaf-3', u'leaf-4'])) 
skipping: [leaf-4] => (item=(u'leafgroup1', [u'leaf-1', u'leaf-2'])) 
skipping: [spine-1] => (item=(u'leafgroup1', [u'leaf-1', u'leaf-2'])) 
skipping: [spine-1] => (item=(u'leafgroup2', [u'leaf-3', u'leaf-4'])) 
ok: [leaf-3] => (item=(u'leafgroup2', [u'leaf-3', u'leaf-4']))
ok: [leaf-2] => (item=(u'leafgroup1', [u'leaf-1', u'leaf-2']))
skipping: [leaf-2] => (item=(u'leafgroup2', [u'leaf-3', u'leaf-4'])) 
ok: [leaf-4] => (item=(u'leafgroup2', [u'leaf-3', u'leaf-4']))
skipping: [spine-2] => (item=(u'leafgroup1', [u'leaf-1', u'leaf-2'])) 
skipping: [spine-2] => (item=(u'leafgroup2', [u'leaf-3', u'leaf-4'])) 

TASK [hostname : write hostname and domain name] *******************************
changed: [leaf-4]
changed: [spine-1]
changed: [leaf-1]
changed: [leaf-3]
changed: [leaf-2]
changed: [spine-2]

TASK [interfaces : write interface configuration] ******************************
changed: [spine-1]
changed: [leaf-2]
changed: [leaf-4]
changed: [leaf-3]
changed: [leaf-1]
changed: [spine-2]

TASK [routing : write routing configuration] ***********************************
changed: [leaf-1]
changed: [leaf-4]
changed: [spine-1]
changed: [leaf-2]
changed: [leaf-3]
changed: [spine-2]

TASK [ntp : write ntp configuration] *******************************************
changed: [leaf-2] => (item=216.239.35.8)
changed: [leaf-1] => (item=216.239.35.8)
changed: [leaf-3] => (item=216.239.35.8)
changed: [spine-1] => (item=216.239.35.8)
changed: [leaf-4] => (item=216.239.35.8)
changed: [spine-2] => (item=216.239.35.8)

PLAY RECAP *********************************************************************
leaf-1                     : ok=6    changed=4    unreachable=0    failed=0   
leaf-2                     : ok=6    changed=4    unreachable=0    failed=0   
leaf-3                     : ok=6    changed=4    unreachable=0    failed=0   
leaf-4                     : ok=6    changed=4    unreachable=0    failed=0   
spine-1                    : ok=4    changed=4    unreachable=0    failed=0   
spine-2                    : ok=4    changed=4    unreachable=0    failed=0   

I didn’t use the leafgroups role for variables in my Playbook but I left it just in case.

Because Arista has nothing similar to Cumulus NetQ to validate the configuration I create a simple arista_check_icmp.yml playbook and use ping from the leaf switches to test if the configuration is successfully deployed.

PLAY [leaf] ********************************************************************

TASK [validate connection from leaf-1] *****************************************
skipping: [leaf-3] => (item=10.255.0.4) 
skipping: [leaf-3] => (item=10.255.0.5) 
skipping: [leaf-3] => (item=10.255.0.6) 
skipping: [leaf-2] => (item=10.255.0.4) 
skipping: [leaf-2] => (item=10.255.0.5) 
skipping: [leaf-2] => (item=10.255.0.6) 
skipping: [leaf-3] => (item=10.0.102.252) 
skipping: [leaf-4] => (item=10.255.0.4) 
skipping: [leaf-3] => (item=10.0.102.253) 
skipping: [leaf-3] => (item=10.0.102.254) 
skipping: [leaf-4] => (item=10.255.0.5) 
skipping: [leaf-2] => (item=10.0.102.252) 
skipping: [leaf-4] => (item=10.255.0.6) 
skipping: [leaf-2] => (item=10.0.102.253) 
skipping: [leaf-2] => (item=10.0.102.254) 
skipping: [leaf-4] => (item=10.0.102.252) 
skipping: [leaf-4] => (item=10.0.102.253) 
skipping: [leaf-4] => (item=10.0.102.254) 
ok: [leaf-1] => (item=10.255.0.4)
ok: [leaf-1] => (item=10.255.0.5)
ok: [leaf-1] => (item=10.255.0.6)
ok: [leaf-1] => (item=10.0.102.252)
ok: [leaf-1] => (item=10.0.102.253)
ok: [leaf-1] => (item=10.0.102.254)

TASK [validate connection from leaf-2] *****************************************
skipping: [leaf-1] => (item=10.255.0.3) 
skipping: [leaf-3] => (item=10.255.0.3) 
skipping: [leaf-1] => (item=10.255.0.5) 
skipping: [leaf-3] => (item=10.255.0.5) 
skipping: [leaf-1] => (item=10.255.0.6) 
skipping: [leaf-3] => (item=10.255.0.6) 
skipping: [leaf-1] => (item=10.0.102.252) 
skipping: [leaf-1] => (item=10.0.102.253) 
skipping: [leaf-4] => (item=10.255.0.3) 
skipping: [leaf-3] => (item=10.0.102.252) 
skipping: [leaf-1] => (item=10.0.102.254) 
skipping: [leaf-3] => (item=10.0.102.253) 
skipping: [leaf-3] => (item=10.0.102.254) 
skipping: [leaf-4] => (item=10.255.0.5) 
skipping: [leaf-4] => (item=10.255.0.6) 
skipping: [leaf-4] => (item=10.0.102.252) 
skipping: [leaf-4] => (item=10.0.102.253) 
skipping: [leaf-4] => (item=10.0.102.254) 
ok: [leaf-2] => (item=10.255.0.3)
ok: [leaf-2] => (item=10.255.0.5)
ok: [leaf-2] => (item=10.255.0.6)
ok: [leaf-2] => (item=10.0.102.252)
ok: [leaf-2] => (item=10.0.102.253)
ok: [leaf-2] => (item=10.0.102.254)

TASK [validate connection from leaf-3] *****************************************
skipping: [leaf-1] => (item=10.255.0.3) 
skipping: [leaf-1] => (item=10.255.0.4) 
skipping: [leaf-2] => (item=10.255.0.3) 
skipping: [leaf-1] => (item=10.255.0.6) 
skipping: [leaf-1] => (item=10.0.101.252) 
skipping: [leaf-2] => (item=10.255.0.4) 
skipping: [leaf-2] => (item=10.255.0.6) 
skipping: [leaf-1] => (item=10.0.101.253) 
skipping: [leaf-4] => (item=10.255.0.3) 
skipping: [leaf-2] => (item=10.0.101.252) 
skipping: [leaf-4] => (item=10.255.0.4) 
skipping: [leaf-1] => (item=10.0.101.254) 
skipping: [leaf-4] => (item=10.255.0.6) 
skipping: [leaf-2] => (item=10.0.101.253) 
skipping: [leaf-4] => (item=10.0.101.252) 
skipping: [leaf-2] => (item=10.0.101.254) 
skipping: [leaf-4] => (item=10.0.101.253) 
skipping: [leaf-4] => (item=10.0.101.254) 
ok: [leaf-3] => (item=10.255.0.3)
ok: [leaf-3] => (item=10.255.0.4)
ok: [leaf-3] => (item=10.255.0.6)
ok: [leaf-3] => (item=10.0.101.252)
ok: [leaf-3] => (item=10.0.101.253)
ok: [leaf-3] => (item=10.0.101.254)

TASK [validate connection from leaf-4] *****************************************
skipping: [leaf-1] => (item=10.255.0.3) 
skipping: [leaf-3] => (item=10.255.0.3) 
skipping: [leaf-1] => (item=10.255.0.4) 
skipping: [leaf-3] => (item=10.255.0.4) 
skipping: [leaf-1] => (item=10.255.0.5) 
skipping: [leaf-2] => (item=10.255.0.3) 
skipping: [leaf-3] => (item=10.255.0.5) 
skipping: [leaf-3] => (item=10.0.101.252) 
skipping: [leaf-2] => (item=10.255.0.4) 
skipping: [leaf-1] => (item=10.0.101.252) 
skipping: [leaf-2] => (item=10.255.0.5) 
skipping: [leaf-2] => (item=10.0.101.252) 
skipping: [leaf-3] => (item=10.0.101.253) 
skipping: [leaf-1] => (item=10.0.101.253) 
skipping: [leaf-1] => (item=10.0.101.254) 
skipping: [leaf-3] => (item=10.0.101.254) 
skipping: [leaf-2] => (item=10.0.101.253) 
skipping: [leaf-2] => (item=10.0.101.254) 
ok: [leaf-4] => (item=10.255.0.3)
ok: [leaf-4] => (item=10.255.0.4)
ok: [leaf-4] => (item=10.255.0.5)
ok: [leaf-4] => (item=10.0.101.252)
ok: [leaf-4] => (item=10.0.101.253)
ok: [leaf-4] => (item=10.0.101.254)

PLAY RECAP *********************************************************************
leaf-1                     : ok=1    changed=0    unreachable=0    failed=0   
leaf-2                     : ok=1    changed=0    unreachable=0    failed=0   
leaf-3                     : ok=1    changed=0    unreachable=0    failed=0   
leaf-4                     : ok=1    changed=0    unreachable=0    failed=0   

I don’t usually work with Arista devices and this was a try to use a different switch vendor but still keep using the type of Ansible Playbook.

Please tell me if you like it and share your feedback.

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Ansible Playbook for Cisco ASAv Firewall Topology

More about Ansible network automation with Cisco ASAv and continuous integration testing like in my previous posts using Vagrant and Gitlab-CI.

Network overview:

Here’s my Github repository where you can find the complete Ansible Playbook: https://github.com/berndonline/asa-lab-provision

Automating firewall configuration is not that easy and can get very complicated because you have different objects, access-lists and service policies to configure which all together makes the playbook complex rather than simple.

What you won’t find in my playbook is how to automate the cluster deployment because this wasn’t possible in my scenario using ASAv and Vagrant. I didn’t have physical Cisco ASA firewall on hand to do this but I might add this later in the coming months.

Let’s look at the different variable files I created; first the host_vars for asa-1.yml which is very similar to a Cisco router:

---

hostname: asa-1
domain_name: lab.local

interfaces:
  0/0:
    alias: connection rtr-1 inside
    nameif: inside
    security_level: 100
    address: 10.0.255.1
    mask: 255.255.255.0

  0/1:
    alias: connection rtr-2 outside
    nameif: outside
    security_level: 0
    address: 217.100.100.1
    mask: 255.255.255.0

routes:
  - route outside 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 217.100.100.254 1

I then use multiple files in group_vars for objects.ymlobject-groups.ymlaccess-lists.yml and nat.yml to configure specific firewall settings.

Roles:

  • Hostname: The task in main.yml uses the Ansible module asa_config and configures hostname and domain name.
  • Interfaces:  This role uses the Ansible module asa_config to deploy the template interfaces.j2 to configure the interfaces. In the main.yml is a second task to enable the interfaces when the previous template applied the configuration.
  • Routing: Similar to the interfaces role and uses also the asa_config module to deploy the template routing.j2 for the static routes
  • Objects: The first task in main.yml loads the objects.yml from group_vars, the second task deploys the template objects.j2.
  • Object-Groups: Uses same tasks in main.yml and template object-groups.j2 like the objects role but the commands are slightly different.
  • Access-Lists: One of the more complicated roles I needed to work on, in the main.yml are multiple tasks to load variables like in the previous roles, then runs a task to clear access-lists if the variable “override_acl” from access-lists.yml group_vars is set to “true” otherwise it skips the next tasks. When the variable are set to true and the access-lists are cleared it then writes new access-lists using the Ansible module asa_acl and finishes with a task to assigning the newly created access-lists to the interfaces.
  • NAT: This role is again similar to the objects role using a task main.yml to load variable file and deploys the template nat.j2. The NAT role uses object nat and only works if you created the object before in the objects group_vars.
  • Policy-Framework: Multiple tasks in main.yml first clears global policy and policy maps and afterwards recreates them. Similar approach like the access lists to keep it consistent.

Main Ansible Playbook site.yml

---

- hosts: asa-1

  connection: local
  user: vagrant
  gather_facts: 'no'

  roles:
    - hostname
    - interfaces
    - routing
    - objects
    - object-groups
    - access-lists
    - nat
    - policy-framework

When a change triggers the gitlab-ci pipeline it spins up the Vagrant instances and executes the main Ansible Playbook. After the Vagrant instances are booted, first the two router rtr-1 and rtr-2 need to be configured with cisco_router_config.yml, then afterwards the main site.yml will be run.

Once the main playbook finishes for the Cisco ASA a last connectivity check will be execute using the playbook asa_check_icmp.yml. Just a simple ping to see if the base configuration is applied correctly.

If everything goes well, like in this example, the job is successful:

I will continue to improve the Playbook and the CICD pipeline so come back later to check it out.

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Using Cumulus NetQ fabric validation with Ansible

Here a new post about Cumulus NetQ, I build a small Ansible playbook to validate the state of MLAG within a Cumulus Linux fabric using automation.

In this case I use the command “netq check clag json” to check for nodes in failed or warning state. This example can be used when doing automated changes to MLAG and to validate the configuration afterwards, or as a pre-check before I execute the main playbook.

---
- hosts: spine leaf
  gather_facts: False
  user: cumulus

  tasks:
     - name: Gather Clag info in JSON
       command: netq check clag json
       register: result
       run_once: true
       failed_when: "'ERROR' in result.stdout"

     - name: stdout string into json
       set_fact: json_output="{{result.stdout | from_json }}"
       run_once: true

     - name: output of json_output variable
       debug:
         var: json_output
       run_once: true

     - name: check failed clag members
       debug: msg="Check failed clag members"
       when: json_output["failedNodes"]|length == 0
       run_once: true

     - name: clag members status failed
       fail: msg="Device {{item['node']}}, Why node is in failed state? {{item['reason']}}"
       with_items:  "{{json_output['failedNodes']}}"
       run_once: true

     - name: clag members status warning
       fail: msg="Device {{item['node']}}, Why node is in warning state? {{item['reason']}}"
       when: json_output["warningNodes"] is defined
       with_items:  "{{json_output['warningNodes']}}"
       run_once: true

Here the output when MLAG is healthy:

PLAY [spine leaf] *********************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

TASK [Gather Clag info in JSON] *******************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
Friday 20 October 2017  17:56:35 +0200 (0:00:00.017)       0:00:00.017 ********
changed: [spine-1]

TASK [stdout string into json] ********************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
Friday 20 October 2017  17:56:35 +0200 (0:00:00.325)       0:00:00.343 ********
ok: [spine-1]

TASK [output of json_output variable] *************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
Friday 20 October 2017  17:56:35 +0200 (0:00:00.010)       0:00:00.353 ********
ok: [spine-1] => {
    "json_output": {
        "failedNodes": [],
        "summary": {
            "checkedNodeCount": 4,
            "failedNodeCount": 0,
            "warningNodeCount": 0
        }
    }
}

TASK [check failed clag members] ******************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
Friday 20 October 2017  17:56:35 +0200 (0:00:00.010)       0:00:00.363 ********
ok: [spine-1] => {
    "msg": "Check failed clag members"
}

TASK [clag members status failed] *****************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
Friday 20 October 2017  17:56:35 +0200 (0:00:00.011)       0:00:00.374 ********

TASK [clag members status warning] ****************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
Friday 20 October 2017  17:56:35 +0200 (0:00:00.007)       0:00:00.382 ********
skipping: [spine-1]

PLAY RECAP ****************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
spine-1                    : ok=4    changed=1    unreachable=0    failed=0

Friday 20 October 2017  17:56:35 +0200 (0:00:00.008)       0:00:00.391 ********
===============================================================================
Gather Clag info in JSON ------------------------------------------------ 0.33s
check failed clag members ----------------------------------------------- 0.01s
stdout string into json ------------------------------------------------- 0.01s
output of json_output variable ------------------------------------------ 0.01s
clag members status warning --------------------------------------------- 0.01s
clag members status failed ---------------------------------------------- 0.01s

In the following example leaf-1 node is in warning state because of a missing “clagd-backup-ip“, another warning could be also a single attached bond interface:

PLAY [spine leaf] *********************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

TASK [Gather Clag info in JSON] *******************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
Friday 20 October 2017  18:02:05 +0200 (0:00:00.016)       0:00:00.016 ********
changed: [spine-1]

TASK [stdout string into json] ********************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
Friday 20 October 2017  18:02:05 +0200 (0:00:00.225)       0:00:00.241 ********
ok: [spine-1]

TASK [output of json_output variable] *************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
Friday 20 October 2017  18:02:05 +0200 (0:00:00.010)       0:00:00.251 ********
ok: [spine-1] => {
    "json_output": {
        "failedNodes": [],
        "summary": {
            "checkedNodeCount": 4,
            "failedNodeCount": 0,
            "warningNodeCount": 1
        },
        "warningNodes": [
            {
                "node": "leaf-1",
                "reason": "Backup IP Failed"
            }
        ]
    }
}

TASK [check failed clag members] ******************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
Friday 20 October 2017  18:02:05 +0200 (0:00:00.010)       0:00:00.261 ********
ok: [spine-1] => {
    "msg": "Check failed clag members"
}

TASK [clag members status failed] *****************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
Friday 20 October 2017  18:02:05 +0200 (0:00:00.011)       0:00:00.273 ********

TASK [clag members status warning] ****************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
Friday 20 October 2017  18:02:05 +0200 (0:00:00.007)       0:00:00.281 ********
failed: [spine-1] (item={u'node': u'leaf-1', u'reason': u'Backup IP Failed'}) => {"failed": true, "item": {"node": "leaf-1", "reason": "Backup IP Failed"}, "msg": "Device leaf-1, Why node is in warning state? Backup IP Failed"}

NO MORE HOSTS LEFT ********************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
	to retry, use: --limit @/home/berndonline/cumulus-lab-vagrant/netq_check_clag.retry

PLAY RECAP ****************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
spine-1                    : ok=4    changed=1    unreachable=0    failed=1

Friday 20 October 2017  18:02:05 +0200 (0:00:00.015)       0:00:00.297 ********
===============================================================================
Gather Clag info in JSON ------------------------------------------------ 0.23s
clag members status warning --------------------------------------------- 0.02s
check failed clag members ----------------------------------------------- 0.01s
output of json_output variable ------------------------------------------ 0.01s
stdout string into json ------------------------------------------------- 0.01s
clag members status failed ---------------------------------------------- 0.01s

Another example is that NetQ reports about a problem that leaf-1 has no matching clagid on peer, in this case on leaf-2 the interface bond1 is missing in the configuration:

PLAY [spine leaf] ***********************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

TASK [Gather Clag info in JSON] *********************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
Monday 23 October 2017  18:49:15 +0200 (0:00:00.016)       0:00:00.016 ********
changed: [spine-1]

TASK [stdout string into json] **********************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
Monday 23 October 2017  18:49:15 +0200 (0:00:00.223)       0:00:00.240 ********
ok: [spine-1]

TASK [output of json_output variable] ***************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
Monday 23 October 2017  18:49:15 +0200 (0:00:00.010)       0:00:00.250 ********
ok: [spine-1] => {
    "json_output": {
        "failedNodes": [
            {
                "node": "leaf-1",
                "reason": "Conflicted Bonds: bond1:matching clagid not configured on peer"
            }
        ],
        "summary": {
            "checkedNodeCount": 4,
            "failedNodeCount": 1,
            "warningNodeCount": 1
        },
        "warningNodes": [
            {
                "node": "leaf-1",
                "reason": "Singly Attached Bonds: bond1"
            }
        ]
    }
}

TASK [check failed clag members] ********************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
Monday 23 October 2017  18:49:15 +0200 (0:00:00.010)       0:00:00.260 ********
skipping: [spine-1]

TASK [clag members status failed] *******************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
Monday 23 October 2017  18:49:15 +0200 (0:00:00.009)       0:00:00.269 ********
failed: [spine-1] (item={u'node': u'leaf-1', u'reason': u'Conflicted Bonds: bond1:matching clagid not configured on peer'}) => {"failed": true, "item": {"node": "leaf-1", "reason": "Conflicted Bonds: bond1:matching clagid not configured on peer"}, "msg": "Device leaf-1, Why node is in failed state? Conflicted Bonds: bond1:matching clagid not configured on peer"}

NO MORE HOSTS LEFT **********************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
	to retry, use: --limit @/home/berndonline/cumulus-lab-vagrant/netq_check_clag.retry

PLAY RECAP ******************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************
spine-1                    : ok=3    changed=1    unreachable=0    failed=1

Monday 23 October 2017  18:49:15 +0200 (0:00:00.014)       0:00:00.284 ********
===============================================================================
Gather Clag info in JSON ------------------------------------------------ 0.22s
clag members status failed ---------------------------------------------- 0.02s
stdout string into json ------------------------------------------------- 0.01s
output of json_output variable ------------------------------------------ 0.01s
check failed clag members ----------------------------------------------- 0.01s

This is just an example to show what possibilities I have with Cumulus NetQ when I use automation to validate my changes.

There are some information in the Cumulus NetQ documentation about, taking preventive steps with your network: https://docs.cumulusnetworks.com/display/NETQ/Taking+Preventative+Steps+with+Your+Network